Golovkin: If Canelo Doesn’t Want To Fight, I Want The WBO Belt

http://www.boxingscene.com/golovkin-if-canelo-want-fight-i-want-wbo-belt–122645

 

By Miguel Rivera

IBF, IBO, WBC, WBA middleweight champion Gennady Golovkin (37-0-1, 33 KOs) is hoping to fight at least three to four times per year.

Because of drawn out negotiations, Golovkin has only fought twice twice per year in 2016 and 2017. Prior to that, he was fighting three to four times a year.

In 2017, he won a very close twelve round unanimous over Daniel Jacobs in March at New York’s Madison Square Garden, and then came back in September to fight to a twelve round split draw with Saul “Canelo” Alvarez at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas.

There are ongoing discussions for Golovkin to face Canelo in a rematch on May 5th, likely at T-Mobile. Both sides are on board with the fight, but right now it’s all about the financial terms coming together.

Last month, Canelo was officially  made the mandatory challenger to Golovkin’s WBC title. The next fighter in line for a crack at that belt is undefeated contender Jermall Charlo.

If that rematch falls through, then Golovkin would like to unify all of the middleweight belts – and there is only one remaining, the WBO title.

Next month, WBO champion Billy Joe Saunders will travel to Canada to defend his title against former IBF champion David Lemieux. Golovkin stopped Lemieux two years ago to pick up the IBF strap.

Saunders has already made it clear that if he beats Lemieux, then the next fight he wants would be Golovkin – unless GGG was defeated by Canelo.

“I would love to fight three or four times a year but I know it’s difficult. If Canelo does not want the fight, then obviously I would love to unify. I can not put pressure on the WBO champion but if he wants I will be willing because my dream is to have all the titles,” Golovkin said to ESPN Deportes.

09/09/2017 Naoya Inoue vs. Antonio Reyes

Date:  Saturday, September 9, 2017

WBO JR. BANTAMWEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP TITLE BOUT

Location: StubHub Center, Carson, California, USA

Promoter:  Teiken Promotions – Akihiko Honda / Promociones Zanfer – Fernando Beltran

Supervisor:   Richard De Cuir

Referee: Lou Moret

Judges:  Larry Hazzard Jr., Fernando Villareal, Zac Young

Results:   The WBO Jr. Bantamweight Champion Naoya Inoue,retained his 115-pound belt for the sixth time against Antonio Nieves by a sixth-round knockout victory.

TV:  USA HBO, Panama RPC Channel 4, Latin America: Canal Space

09/09/2017 Oleksandr Usyk vs. Marco Huck

Date:  Saturday, September 9, 2017

WBO JR. HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP TITLE BOUT

Location: Max-Schmeling-Halle, Prenzlauer Berg, Berlin, Germany 

Promoter:  Sauerland Event / Wilfried Sauerland

Supervisor:   Istvan Kovacs

Referee: Robert Byrd

Judges:  Zoltan Enyedi, Matteo Montella, Robin Taylor

Results:   WBO Jr. Heavyweight Champion Oleksandr Usyk (13-0, 11 KOs) successfully defended his title in stopping former champion Marco Huck (40-5-1, 27 KOs) in the 10th round.

TV:  Canada Super Channel, Germany SAT.1

Photos: Usyk Dominates, Stops Marco Huck in Tenth Round

By Alexey Sukachev

Berlin, Germany – In the first bout of the World Boxing Super Series Cruiserweight tournament, Oleksandr Usyk (13-0, 11 KOs) scored a tenth round stoppage of former champion Marco Huck (40-5-1, 27 KOs) to retain the WBO Jr. Heavyweight title.

Usyk will now have to face the winner of the September 30th clash between WBC champion Mairis Briedis and Mike Perez, which takes place in Latvia.

The tournament has been given to us by Comosa AG – a specifically created franchise, which has familiar names of Richard Schaefer and Sauerland Event behind it – is a play-off style tournament between the certain division’s best fighters. The tournament formula has previously proved to be successful in both long-time and short-period formats.

In round one, Usyk, 30 years old, stayed at the distance, using his excellent footwork to avoid long, lean power shots of the former WBO Jr. Heavyweight champion. Huck was reserved and fought behind his trademark high guard. Huck exploded during the last minute of the round, landing several hard shots on the gloves of Usyk, wisely attached to he back of his head, as the German tried to apply his well-known dirty tactics to distract the Ukrainian. Usyk retaliated with body shots.

The second saw the champion utilizing his potent southpaw jab to keep Huck at bay. The Kapt’n was powerful enough to make his way throw those connections but not enough power to trouble Usyk on the inside. The Ukrainian bombed Huck during the last minute of the round and hurt him at the ropes with several straight left hands. Usyk’s jab was at is prettiest in the third, as he peppered the veteran one-two-three more times. WBO #9 and TBRB #10 Huck tried straight right hands against the Ukrainian southpaw but landed few, as the champion perfectly controlled the distance, forcing the German to miss badly. Usyk exploded with short left power punches at the end of the round. Huck was pinned to the ropes and lucky not to go down after several clear landings.

Clinches appeared as a new weapon for Huck in the fourth. But to apply clinch you should be near your opponent, and Huck had increasingly harder time getting in throw major right jab of Usyk. The German landed a huge right hand to warn Usyk at the end of the second minute of the round, but the Ukrainian retaliated with hard damaging blows, once again pummeling the veteran fighter around the ring. Usyk was the boss of the fifth, as he kept stalking Huck and pinning him with big left hands. The challenger’s outbursts were scarce, producing little effect on his onrushing opponent. The end of the round saw Huck reeling, with the smiling Ukrainian landing one punch after another.

The sixth wasn’t a busy round for both. Usyk looked for a short pause, and Huck was battered enough where he was unable to produce meaningful offensive against the Ukrainian. However, in the seventh, the battering continued for the 32-year old German Bosnian, whose birth name is Muamer Hukic. Usyk was all over Huck during the last two minutes of the round, dealing damage to the German, playing with him, beating him to the punch.

The Battery continued into the eighth, as Usyk was once again all over Huck. Marco showed solid chin and will to withstand the champion’s attacks and to retaliate, though the counter fire was sparse. Usyk tried to went in for kill after landing a huge left bomb at the end of the round but he slipped, and the German immediately hit him with a right hand while Usyk was down. Referee Robert Byrd interrupted the action and deducted a point from Huck.

The Ukrainian continued to humiliate Huck in the ninth, and the German’s mild successes were becoming increasingly rare. Huck was landing punches below the beltline yet he was hurt several times in the ninth. Usyk mixed body shots and head punches to double the effect

The logic end of a one-sided beatdown was reached in the tenth round. Usyk applied a non-stop aggression towards Huck, missing almost zero punches and landing them at will. Huck, his face reddened, had been wobbling around the ring in pain for two minutes, before the referee finally waved it off at 2:50 of the tenth.

www.boxingscene.com/photos-usyk-dominates-stops-marco-huck-tenth-round–120335?print_friendly=1

08/26/2017 Miguel Cotto vs. Yoshihiro Kamegai

Date:  Saturday, August 26, 2017

WBO JR. MIDDLEWEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP TITLE BOUT

Location:  StubHub Center, Carson, California, USA

Promoter:   Golden Boy Promotions/Oscar De La Hoya; Miguel Cotto Promotions/Miguel Cotto; Teiken Promotions/Akihiko Honda

Supervisor:   Francisco Valcarcel, Esq.

Referee: Lou Moret

Judges:  Robin Taylor (120-108); Pat Russell (119-109); Zac Young (118-110)

Results:   The vacant WBO Junior Middleweight World Title was obtained by Miguel Cotto (41-5, 33 KOs) with a unanimous decision victory against the Japanese Yoshihiro “El Maestrito” Kamegai (27-4-2, 24 KOs).

TV:  USA HBO, Latin America: Canal Space

Cotto beats Kamegai, wins WBO 154lb title

By Miguel Maravilla at ringside
Photos: Sumio Yamada

While most of the world’s attention was focused on the Mayweather-McGregor spectacle in Las Vegas, The action was in Southern California as Puerto Rico’s only four-division world champion Miguel Cotto (41-5, 33 KOs) returned to the ring Saturday night at the Stub Hub Center in Carson, California against Japan’s Yoshihiro “El Maestrito” Kamegai (27-4-2, 24 KOs).

It was an action packed fight from start to finish with Cotto adding another world title to his legacy in taking a hard fought decision over the Japanese warrior Kamegai who kept bringing throughout the night.

Kamegai came right at Cotto sneaking in the right hands and backing him to the ropes but in the closing seconds Cotto connected with a huge left hook. Continuing to go at Cotto, Kamegai pressed in round two as they went toe to toe. The Japanese kept the aggression in round three as Cotto boxed away landing power shots. Circling the ring in round four Cotto landed big but despite that, Kamegai continued to go at him taking his best shots.

Cotto landed a huge right hand to start the fifth snapping Kamegai’s head back tagging him throughout the round but that didn’t bother to shy away the Japanese warrior who kept coming banging his gloves together. Nothing seemed to bother Kamegai as he kept running into Cotto’s bombs in the sixth and pressing, the Puerto Rican boxed effectively. Past the halfway point in the seventh Cotto continued his dominance but Kamegai’s heart made it a fight as he kept coming.

Late in the fight in round nine the Puerto Rican landed power combinations snapping Kamegai’s head again. In round ten Cotto circled the ring boxing away but there was no stopping Kamegai. The championship rounds was all Cotto as he kept it conservative and sealing it in route to a decision win as the judges scored the fight 120-108, 119-109, and 118-110.

 

www.fightnews.com/cotto-beats-kamegai-wins-wbo-154lb-title/3695

08/19/2017 Terence Crawford vs. Julius Indongo

Date:  Saturday – August 19, 2017

WBO/WBA/IBF/WBC  JR. WELTERWEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP TITLE BOUT

Location:  Pinnacle Bank Arena, Lincoln, Nebraska, USA

Promoter:  Top Rank / Bob Arum

Supervisor:  John Duggan, Esq.

Referee:  Jack Reiss

Judges:  Glenn Feldman, Max De Luca, Steve Weisfeld

Results: The WBO Champion Terence Crawford Crawford gains the WBA and IBF junior welterweight titles, adding to the WBC and WBO belts, when he  dropped Julius Indongo in the second round, before finishing him off in the third on a hard body shot. Julius Indongo (22-1, 11 KO) was down for the full ten count,

TV:   ESPN3

Hooker Back in the Ring Saturday

By Robert Hughes
Photos: Stacey Verbeek

While Terrance Crawford is 650 miles north in Lincoln, Nebraska fighting for all the other super lightweight belts, Maurice ‘Mighty Mo’ Hooker will be battling Courtney ‘CJ’ Jackson for the NABO Super-Lightweight [Jr. Welterweight] title on Saturday at the Omni Hotel in Dallas, Texas.

Crawford will be watched by millions on ESPN taking on Julius Indongo and raising lots of money for himself. Hooker [22-0-3, 16 KO] will make somewhat less and headline a non-televised black-tie fundraiser for a DFW-area chapter of The Links, Incorporated. 

Crawford is the top of the rail but ‘Mighty Mo’ is not 650 miles behind the world’s top 140-pounder. Until they meet, if ever, in the ring Mighty Mo is taking on an undefeated, untested fighter who was carefully picked for Hooker’s handlers, Arnie Verbeek and trainer Vincent Parra.

“There was a short list,” Verbeek said. “Roc Nation thought this was the best fight, they presented it to us and we could’ve vetoed whatever we’d like.”

A quick troll through Jackson’s perfect 17-0-0, 10 KO professional record exposes a textbook list of human tin cans. A [not-so random] tally of seven Jackson opponents shows a combined record of 1-98-0 and only three of the 10 others owning winning records. 

“It’s not going 10 rounds – it won’t make it past five,” Hooker predicts.

Nice! Sounds easy. So when will ‘Mighty Mo’ match up with Crawford at 140 pounds?

“We’re ranked No. 2 WBO so at some point they are going to have to put us in there,” Verbeek said, while emphasizing he is not focused on rankings nor titles, right now.

This will be Hooker’s fifth fight under the Roc Nation banner, an organization that undoubtedly would like to see him win some world titles.

Promoters have served Jackson well by arranging this title bout but he can’t have any delusions about walking out of the ring with that perfect record, or an NABO belt. The 29-year-old Homestead, Fla. resident is catching a tough, talented champion on the upswing of his career, a fighter with faster hands, supreme boxing skills and one has been pushed to the brink of defeat without submission.

Hooker is no tin can.

“He’s about to peak,” Parra said about Hooker’s career curve. “He just turned 28 so the next couple years are crucial – we’re preparing Mo to be the best Mo he can be.”

Style-wise this is not a good matchup of Jackson’s short hands against Hooker’s long arms. Jackson doesn’t look slow, he just doesn’t get his arms away from his body like he will need to against a taller, faster fighter. It’s hard to imagine Jackson hitting Hooker with anything that matters. If Mo keeps him away from the body it should be a quick main event.

“He’s tough, he’s inspired, he’s got a little bit of history behind him and built himself a nice little record,” Parra said about Jackson. “He’s about to find out there’s levels to this; Maurice is gonna handle business.”

Putting aside respect for the other camp, this is a classic tune-up for one of North America’s best true junior welterweights. A can’t-lose matchup in front of a hometown audience, dressed wonderfully for the occasion while raising money and awareness for a 36-year-old organization that helps lower-income families in the Mid-Cities region of the greater Dallas-Fort Worth area.

Hooker trained in Dallas for this weekend’s fight but usually spends much of his camp-time in San Diego and in the San Bernardino Mountains, training where other boxers go to suck in the thin air above Southern California’s air pollution at 6,750 feet elevation.

“I love Big Bear training camp, there’s nothing to do but train,” Hooker said.

Hooker has no problem weighing in under the super lightweight limit of 140 pounds. His slim build hides a powerful right hand. Hooker feels his best assets in the ring are his jab and his power. He sparred this camp with welterweight Greg Jackson, of Philadelphia, Johnny Garcia from Michigan and DFW lightweight Manuel Rey Rojas, among others. 

Hooker is a family man who he thinks he has two or three more fights at 140 pounds “And go from there, he said. “I want to retire around 154 with a couple title belts.” 

NABO Super Lightweight Title – Maurice Hooker vs. Cortney Jackson
Saturday, August 19, 2017 – Omni Hotel, Dallas, Texas

www.fightnews.com/hooker-back-ring-saturday/3121

Terence Crawford-Julius Indongo: Risk All Around

By Cliff Rold

Title unification was never easy.

That was true well before the WBC broke away from the WBA in the 1960s. In the 1930s, the middleweight and flyweight titles had a slew of claimants to the world title. Everyone was making enough money that holding off on ultimate ‘unification’ took about a decade to complete.

Money is the root of it after all.

Most of the fighters who hold belts aren’t worried about losing a boxing match. They’re worried about losing a check. If you’re a Strawweight champion making five figures for a title fight, that’s a hell of a lot better place to be than the strawweights without a belt. Risking a title against another champion makes it harder to make a living. It only makes sense if it pays well more than defending often in front of a paying home court until a dangerous mandatory comes along.

It’s not very sporting but, for most of the beltholders in boxing, it’s rational.

They made the risk worth the reward for the fighter with more to lose this weekend.

To be sure, both Julius Indongo and Terence Crawford have a lot on the line. Each holds two of the four most recognized sanctioning body titles. They stand to have the largest audience of their respective careers on ESPN (10 PM EST/7 PM PST) with solid fight week coverage to get the word out.

Unlike Crawford (31-0, 22 KO), an American fighter with an established base of fans in Nebraska and lots of US TV exposure, Indongo (22-0, 11 KO) likely has less chance to rebound if he loses this weekend. Indongo is already 34 and, for most American fans, unknown even with his WBA and IBF belts.

Indongo might have been able to milk those belts for a while and spread out the paydays. Instead, he’s trying to finish a gutsy road trip trifecta.

Namibia’s Indongo went to Russia and knocked out Russia’s Eduard Troyanovsky (26-1, 23 KO) last year for the IBF strap. He went to Glasgow to beat Scotland’s Ricky Burns for the WBA strap.

Now he’s in Lincoln Nebraska trying to go from invisible man to undisputed champion in three fights.

Lose memorably and there could be other days for Indongo. Lose wide and he may be forgotten as quickly as he emerged. Indongo is gambling big on himself and deserves credit for it.

Crawford merits plenty of credit too. The WBC, WBO, and lineal champ is a talented fighter on the cusp of the real high dollar promised land. Indongo is the sort of guy a man in his position might not normally want to mess with. Indongo is longer, taller, and has shown the pressure of being the away team does not stifle him.

The risk for Crawford isn’t that a loss could make him anonymous. For Crawford, the risk is that a loss could provide a long-term rationale for fighters to avoid him and cut off his avenues to the biggest fights that could be made.

He is, in some sense, where the late Vernon Forrest found himself in 2003. After two wins over “Sugar” Shane Mosley, Forrest was the lineal welterweight champion and the consensus 2002 Fighter of the Year. He could begin to realistically dream about chasing the golden goose of his era: Oscar De La Hoya. All he had to do was keep winning and hope public pressure and consistent victory opened a door down the road.

Forrest opted for a unification clash with wild swinging, big talking Ricardo Mayorga. The odds were heavily in Forrest’s favor.

Mayorga stopped him in three and then won a decision in the immediate rematch.

Forrest was far from done. HBO and Showtime still had room for him and he added two reigns at Jr. middleweight. It was a hell of a career.

It just never quite landed on the jackpot fight.

Crawford has won recognition from both Ring and TBRB as the rightful champion at lightweight and Jr. welterweight. He’s already had a hell of a career but the true riches lay just a little farther away. This might be the absolute worst time to lose he could find.  

It’s what makes this a fight to be excited about. While both men are getting a reported seven figures, that’s not the sort of sum after taxes that puts one in a safe zone for life. They’re getting good money in the hopes of great money somewhere down the line.

They’re also fighting to do something only one other fighter has done.

Since the WBO came into existence in the late 1980s, only two fighters have held all four major belts simultaneously: Bernard Hopkins who unified the middleweight crown and Jermain Taylor who took it from him. The winner Saturday will be the third.

Unification was never easy. In the four-belt era, it’s so difficult almost no one even bothers to try.

Crawford and Indongo are both bothering. Who will find their risk rewarded?  

www.boxingscene.com/terence-crawford-julius-indongo-risk-all-around–119595?print_friendly=1

Jeff Horn Can’t Wait To Prove Point By “Beating Pacquiao Again!”

2012 Australian Olympian Jeff Horn (17-0-1, 11 KOs) is very eager to get in the ring with Manny Pacquiao for a second time.

Last week, Pacquiao’s promoter Bob Arum of Top Rank confirmed to BoxingScene.com that his fighter had exercised an immediate rematch clause to meet Horn in the ring before the year is out.

Last month, Horn pulled off a major upset when he secured the WBO welterweight world title with a twelve round unanimous decision over Pacquiao before a crowd of 51,000 fans at the Suncorp Stadium in Brisbane, Australia.

The decision was deemed controversial by a lot of observers, who felt Pacquiao had done enough to win. But nobody disagrees with the fact that Pacquiao’s performance was flat and his activity was lacking.

Horn wants to prove that his victory was no fluke.

“I’m happy for a rematch, especially after all the flak I received before the second scoring came out. Now it’s out, I still receive people saying I didn’t win. I’m willing to prove it again and beat him for the second time,” Horn said to the Sydney Morning Herald.

“I’m still proving a point. I’ve got to make sure I train just as hard. I never say I want a knockout but it’s always easier if the fight ends before the 12th round. I can improve a lot more from where I have been in the past. I think I did well in the last fight, I’ll do better the second time,” he said. “I’ve done it before, I know what I have to do to try hard and do it again. I know I can push through to more levels.”

The rematch, like the first, will take place in Horn’s backyard of Australia, likely on a date in November. Because of the winter weather, the rematch will have to take place indoors. The paper notes that the Queensland government has first and last rights but their entertainment centre only holds 13,000 fans. Melbourne has Etihad Stadium with a roof while Sydney’s Qudos Bank Arena holds 21,000.

www.boxingscene.com/jeff-horn-t-wait-prove-point-by-beating-pacquiao-again–119266

Christina Hammer: Claressa Shields is NOT as Good as Me!

DETROIT — Claressa Shields is calling herself the GWOAT.

In the boxing ring, it’s hard to argue with her boast of being the Greatest Woman Of All Time.

“Who’s better than me?” Shields asked after pummeling Nikki Adler on Friday night, giving the two-time Olympic champion the Women’s WBC and IBF Super Middleweight world titles. “I don’t know of anybody yet. And if I do find somebody, I’m ready to take her out.”

The lopsided fight was mercifully stopped at 1:34 of the fifth round, awarding Shields a victory by technical knockout. She used a combination of powerful punches that left Adler defenseless in a matchup of previously unbeaten boxers.

“I felt tired and weak in the ring,” Adler said after her U.S. debut.

She looked tired and weak, too.

The 22-year-old Shields took control against the 30-year-old Adler in the opening round, landing a flurry of blows that sent her staggering against the ropes.

Shields (4-0, 2 KOs) didn’t let up in the second, stunning Adler (16-1) with a left hook midway through the round. Shields went to her body in the third round before aiming high in the fourth, hitting Adler squarely in the face with a right that seemed to set up the end of the fight in the fifth.

In the end, Shields landed 136 of 340 punches while Adler connected on just 6 of 84. In the first and fifth round, Adler failed to connect once.

“She wouldn’t punch,” Shields said. “Then when the hook stumbled her, I said, `Oh man, she ain’t got no chin?’ When I saw that, I was like, `It’s going to be an early night for her.’ I thought she was a bit tougher. I must’ve hurt her really bad because she stopped punching and I dominated after the first round.”

WBO and WBC middleweight champion Christina Hammer (21-0, 9 KOs) watched the bout near the ring, scouting potential opponents and rooting against Adler, who also lives in Germany.

“I hope to fight Claressa next year,” Hammer said, wearing a gold dress and displaying her championship belts in an empty seat next to her.

Hammer, who is from Kazakhstan, got her wish and some advice from Shields as both stood near each other during post-fight interviews.

“She better keep her hands up,” Shields said.

Adler tried that, and putting her white gloves in front of her face was no match for Shields’ shots to her head.

Hammer, though, wasn’t impressed.

“You are not as good as me,” Hammer flatly told Shields in the ring.

The nearly 1,000 fans who filled a ballroom at the MGM Grand Detroit loved the dominating performance, cheering for a fighter from Flint, Michigan, who seemed to have a lot of supporters that made the hourlong drive from her hometown. Shields became the first woman to headline a fight card on premium cable in March, and she did it again Friday night, earning top billing on Showtime.

She is the only American, male or female, to win a boxing gold medal since Ward captured one in Athens in 2004. The only other U.S. boxer to win two Olympic gold medals is Oliver Kirk, who won took bantamweight and featherweight titles at the 1904 Olympics.

As the stage she fights on potentially gets larger, Shields plans to take some time off before figuring out what’s next.

“Me and my team got to sit down and see which fights make sense,” she said.

www.boxingscene.com/christina-hammer-claressa-shields-not-good-me–119197?print_friendly=1

08/05/2017 Vasyl Lomachenko vs. Miguel Marriaga


Date: Saturday – August 5, 2017

WBO JR. LIGHTWEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP TITLE BOUT

Location:  Microsoft Theater, Los Angeles, California, USA

Promoter:  Top Rank /Bob Arum

Supervisor:  Richard De Cuir

Referee:   Jack Reiss

Judges:  

Results:  The WBO Jr. Lightweight Champion Vasyl Lomachenko made a massive shot knocked Miguel Marriaga down in the closing seconds of the seventh round.  Lomachenko retained the WBO junior lightweight title with the win.

TV:   USA ESPN

Hughie Fury’s old school training camp

Credit:  Photos by Hennessy Sports/Karen Priestley –

WBO heavyweight title challenger Hughie Fury has based himself at a spartan-style training camp at Lake Windermere as he heads into the biggest fight of his life against undefeated WBO champion Joseph Parker. Fury has set up camp in the mountains with his father and trainer Peter for his showdown with Parker on Saturday 23rd September at the Manchester Arena.

While thousands of tourists and holiday makers enjoy the beauty and tranquility of the Lake District, Fury is experiencing the flip side and is putting his body and mind through hell in the rough and brutal surrounding terrain to become the first man to beat Parker.

The 22-year-old Manchester star is going through a daily grueling schedule of long mountain runs and sprints, log chopping, free climbing mountains and lake swimming sessions, alongside sparring and boxing gym session and believes that this will give him the extra edge to become the new WBO world champion.

“We’ve come up here just to do runs in the past and we’ve always said that this would be a fantastic place to set up a training camp and what better time than now for the world title fight against Parker,” said Fury, the undefeated WBO mandatory and number one ranked challenger.

“This is absolutely perfect for me, I love the outdoors and the fresh air and the feeling of getting back-to-basics is getting the very best out of me. The greats of boxing like Ali, Dempsey and Louis all did it this way, in modern times we’ve all gone scientific with boxing training, but there’s a lot to be said about training the old way and I feel fitter and stronger than ever before.”

“I’m training at altitude with my some of the mountain runs leaving my lungs burning, I’m pulling tires attached to my back on uphill sprints, free climbing up the side of mountains that leave my arms and fingers burning and then I’m going for endurance swims and sprints in the freezing lakes.”

“Then there’s the log chopping, it used to be common place for boxers to do this in the past, but it seems to have died out with some boxers going all body beautiful with weights in the gym. It strengthens every muscle in your body from your hamstrings, calves, quads and gluts to your abs, lats, traps, deltoids and pecs while working my cardiovascular endurance,”

“When the hard training is done for the day, then I can just rest and look out at the stunning and peaceful scenery around me, but strangely focus my mind on smashing Parker to bits and tearing the world title away from him,”

“I know that wherever he is training now he’s putting himself through the same to keep hold of his title, but that is pushing me every day to train twice as hard and go through my physical and mental limits. I know that on the 23rd September he won’t have an answer to what I’ve got.”

 Photo: Hennessy Sports/Karen Priestley

Peter is overseeing his son’s training and implementing the fight strategy to defeat the fearsome puncher Parker who has 18 KOs from 23 fights. 

He masterfully guided his nephew Tyson to his stunning victory over Wladimir Klitschko in November 2015, who had not been defeated in nearly 11 years, to become the Undisputed World Heavyweight Champion and believes Hughie can pull off a similar feat against Parker.

“Ali trained at Deer Lake and many of the greats trained at Big Bear in California, more recently Gennady Golovkin. The benefits are ten-fold training here in Lake Windermere. It’s the best way to train, it’s outdoor, non-polluted, rigorous mountain runs, quarries, tree and log chopping, lakes for swimming, it’s got everything we need. Then we’ve got tremendous indoor facilities as well with the local boxing gym in Windermere and Choices Spa and Health club in Troutbeck Bridge. Hughie will be in the best shape of his life against Parker and more than prepared. Everything thing we do is to win and he’ll be the new WBO World Champion.”

www.fightnews.com/hughie-furys-old-school-training-camp/1832

Kimura dethrones Shiming with shock TKO

Photos: Sumio Yamada

Unheralded underdog Sho Kimura (15-1-2, 7 KOs) scored a stunning eleventh round TKO over WBO flyweight champion Zou Shiming (9-2, 2 KOs) on Friday night to claim the WBO belt at the Oriental Sports Center in Shanghai, China. 

Bleeding badly from a cut above the right eye, Kumura finally caught up with the fleet-footed Zou and battered him to the canvas with a barrage of punches. Zou staggered to his feet but was unable to continue. Time was 2:28. At the time of the stoppage, Zou was ahead 96-94, 97-93 on two cards. Kimura was ahead 96-94 on the third card.

This was Shiming’s first defense and first fight since bolting from promoter Top Rank and trainer Freddie Roach. Shiming promoted this card himself under his Zouxuan Sports banner.

            

www.fightnews.com/kimura-dethrones-shiming-shock-tko/1841

Sho Kimura knocks out Zou Shiming to claim WBO crown

 L-Brico Santig, R-Sho Kimura photo by Brico Santig

Sho Kimura scored a massive upset when he knocks out former olympian and China’s only boxing world champion Zou Shiming in eleventh round to claim the WBO world flyweight title in Shanghai China.

Kimura improves his record to 15 wins with 8 knockouts , 2 draws and 1 defeat while Shiming drops to 9 wins with 2 defeats.

Kimura became the third Japanese world champion at flyweight (112 pounds) along WBA champion Kazuto Ioka and WBC champion Daigo Higa.

www.powcast.net/2017/07/sho-kimura-knocks-out-zou-shiming-to.html

 

07/28/2017 Shiming Zou vs. Sho Kimura

Date:  Friday – July 28, 2017

WBO FLYWEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP TITLE BOUT

Location:  Shanghai Oriental Sports Center, Shanghai, China

Promoter:  Zou Xuan Sport & Culture Development Co. LTD

Supervisor:  Leon Panoncillo, Jr.

Referee:   Danrex Tapdasan

Judges:   Robert Hoyle  96-94,  Edward Ligas  93-97, Sawaeng Thaweekoon  94-96

Results:  The WBO Flyweight Championship Title was won by Sho Kimura.  Sho Kimura (15-1-2, 7 KOs) scored a stunning eleventh round TKO over WBO flyweight champion Zou Shiming (9-2, 2 KOs) to claim the WBO belt against Zou Shiming by KO at the 11th round.

TV:   

Photos: Zou Shiming, Sho Kimura – Face To Face at Final Presser

By Unus Alladin

Remember the original Rocky movie? The scene when Apollo Creed is busy wheeling and dealing over his desk and one of his trainers, intrigued by Balboa punching cow carcasses on the TV news report remarks: “You better see this. He means business” by which Creed angrily retorts: “No, I mean business!”

The movie, as we all know, is one of Hollywood’s beloved fictional sports movies, but it seems the scene is being played out in real life in Shanghai where China’s golden boy, Zou Shiming, is preparing to make his first WBO world title defence.

Creed narrowly won his first fight against Rocky by points – he lost the title to Rocky in Rocky II – but the movie depicted Creed as a boxing entrepreneur, who underestimated his opponent.

Zou is the two-time Olympic gold medallist turned professional fighter, turned professional flyweight champion and he treads into unknown territory after he made the announcement this year that he was going to be his own man and promote his own fight as he steps into the ring for the 11th time on July 28.

Zou raised eyebrows by refusing to renew his contract with US promoters Top Rank, who helped him make the transition from top amateur to leading professional in less than four years. But Top Rank will, this time, not help the 36-year-old Zou in any shape or form – nor will his long-time Chinese sports agent and marketing partner, Seca.

Zou will do it alone and that could backfire, as Seca boss Li Sheng suggested recently. “I think he’s making a big mistake,” Li said. “He made the decision to promote the fight by himself with his wife [Ran Yingying]. If he wants to become his own promoter, that’s his own choice. He made the decision after he won the world title last November.”

Zou, who is also the three-time amateur world champion, might know a thing or two about fighting but promoting is not his forte and it will be a whole new ball game for the Zunyi-born fighter. Promotion is a tough business. Sponsors must be found, fighters have to be paid and tickets have to be sold to make the event a success. A weak undercard is not going to help, too. Since Zou is putting up his own money to promote his own title defence, expenses are going to run up.

Fighters are usually wary about whether they are going to get paid. There have been many cases of unscrupulous promoters taking the money and running. Without a reputable name like Top Rank behind him, it’s going to be a slog for the now entrepreneurial mainlander.

Zou takes on Japan’s seventh-ranked Sho Kimura (14-1-2, 7 KOs) at the Shanghai Oriental Sports Centre but the mainlander could find himself in a vulnerable position this time.

Alisports, which is part of e-commerce giant Alibaba, is helping Zou as a partner to promote the event but the boxer they call “Fists of Gold” needed a lot of help – from Hong Kong of all places – with Rex Tso’s manager, Jay Lau Chi-yuen, helping him find suitable sparring partners to be flown to Shanghai.

“It was significant that I won the belt in Las Vegas, the boxing temple. I want to bring this glory and passion, as well as the boxing culture, to China,” said Zou in an interview with Agence France-Presse this week.

“I know this business back to front: not just the training, but also their minds, their injuries, their illness and their promotion,” he said.

In the past, everything was arranged for Zou – his training, his purse and promotion – but this time, he will have do things himself, something he has no experience in.

There are rumours Zou doesn’t even have a proper coach and his preparations haven’t been going too smoothly although Zou insisted he will be ready to defend his title.

Without the services of Hall of Famer Freddie Roach, who oversaw Zou’s previous 10 bouts, plus all the modern facilities that were at his disposal in the United States before, Zou could be reverting back to his amateur days … and that’s risky.

Underestimating Kimura, who Hong Kong fans know well, having seen the Japanese knock out his last opponent on the undercard of the Rex Tso-Hirofumi Mukai fight in March, could prove disastrous.

What if Zou loses? Can he fill Shanghai Oriental Sports Centre? Could he end up losing money?

Zou says he is trying to build up the sport and boxing in China. But in essence, he is promoting his own event so that he can earn a much larger slice of the pie.

Nothing wrong with that with a family to feed but if things don’t go well for him and he loses, it will make it that much harder for him to get another world title shot now that he is 36.

It will be interesting to see how Zou fares in Shanghai and whether going alone turns out to be the right decision for him or a bad idea that could spell disaster to his career.

www.boxingscene.com/photos-zou-shiming-sho-kimura-face-face-final-presser–118864

Photos: Miguel Cotto Grinding Hard For Kamegai Showdown

World renowned trainer Freddie Roach shared important details regarding the training camp of Miguel Cotto (40-5, 33 KOs), the only Puerto Rican boxer to ever win world titles in four divisions, as he prepares to go to war for the vacant WBO Junior Middleweight title against the Japanese slugger Yoshihiro “El Maestrito” Kamegai (27-3-2, 24 KOs). Cotto will attempt to obtain a sixth world title in four divisions and will appear on HBO for an astounding 23rd time. The event takes place Saturday, August 26 at the StubHub Center in Carson, California and will be televised live on HBO World Championship Boxing® beginning at 9:45 p.m. ET/PT.

Roach, a Hall of Fame trainer who was supervising a recent sparring session at the Wild Card Boxing Club, shared Cotto’s training camp routine, which consists of:

    Strength and conditioning at 5:00 am with Gavin McMillan (exercises are done either at the gym, pool, nearby hills or at the track).
    Breakfast at around 8:30 am. (Cotto likes to cook all his meals himself; his diet is normal, avoiding fried food).
    Light snack at around 11:15 am.
    Sparring three days a week at 1:00 pm on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.
    Boxing routine on at 1:00 pm on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
    Dinner at around 5:30 pm.

Roach also provided additional training camp details, including the strategy for taking advantage of the exciting and crowd-pleasing style of Kamegai.

“Kamegai [Yoshihiro] is very aggressive and I like that. I think it should make for a great fight because he’s coming forward all the time and always looking for a knockout. Guys who look for knockouts, get knocked out. So, we’re working on countering his attack, and it’s going really well so far,” Roach concluded.

“I feel great, everything is working perfectly in camp together with Freddie and Gavin on every workout session. Freddie has a great game plan and I just follow him and do my best every day at gym. We look forward to have a big win” Miguel Cotto said.

“For more than 16 years, Miguel Cotto has represented Puerto Rico. He has given fans incredible fights at a number of weight classes, and has won world titles in an astounding four divisions,” said Oscar De La Hoya. “Now, after nearly two years out of the ring, as he attempts to claim a sixth championship belt, we are fully expecting a tough war between him and Kamegai.

www.boxingscene.com/photos-miguel-cotto-grinding-hard-kamegai-showdown–118866?print_friendly=1

Photos: Zou Shiming, Sho Kimura Make Weight For Battle

By Unus Alladin

Chinese star Zou Shiming will be fighting for a larger piece of the pie as a boxer turned promoter, while Japanese underdog Sho Kimura will be fighting in his late mother’s honour in Friday night’s eagerly anticipated WBO flyweight title fight in Shanghai.

Zou recently turned to promoting his own fight after severing links with American promoter Top Rank last year and he will be out to make a good start to this new phase of his career in his first defence of the world title he won in Las Vegas last November.

But Kimura (14-1-2, 7 KOs) warned he will be highly motivated – driven by a desire to honour his mother who died at the age of 44 as he was growing up. He said her passing had motivated him to “train harder than before”. The 28-year-old Tokyo-based fighter also said winning was the only way to “get out of poverty” and live a “financially stable life”.

“I come from a poor family. I can’t even afford a new pair of training shoes,” said Kimura, who spent weeks in Thailand to prepare for the fight at the Shanghai Oriental Sports Centre. Zou tipped the scales at 111.9 pounds, while Kimura was a little lighter at 111.6 pounds, well within the 112-pound limit at Thursday’s official weigh-in.

“Zou Shiming will find out that it’s not going to be easy to beat me. I come from Japan and we are tough warriors. Zou is well known in China, but I can be well known and famous if I beat him. I must take this opportunity and win. Once I start, I am not going to stop until I win. The crowd might get behind Zou, but that’s going to motivate me even more,” he said.

Kimura spoke about growing up in poverty and his struggles to make ends meet.

“I have been struggling all my life. I have been using the same gloves for years and I can’t buy a new pair. The gloves I am wearing are still good even though they are worn out. I do part-time work in a restaurant where I help the restaurant deliver [crates of] beer. If I win this bout, I will quit that job,” said Kimura, who lost his first professional fight in 2013 but has been on an unbeaten streak since.

“I’m going to win this belt and take it home and put it on my mother’s grave. When I won the WBO Asia Pacific flyweight title [last November in Osaka] I put my belt on my mother’s grave. But this one is for the world championship. This one is much more prestigious,” he said.

Kimura is known to Hong Kong fans as he was on the undercard of the Rex Tso vs Hirofumi Mukai clash in March. The Japanese won that fight in a second-round knockout against Thailand’s Wisitsak Saiwaewk.

However, the 36-year-old Zou (9-1-0, 2 KOs) was extremely confident of winning his latest fight, saying he won’t allow the belt to leave China.

“I won this belt in America [Las Vegas] last year. It’s staying here. It’s not going anywhere,” said the two-time Olympic gold medallist as he showed off his belt. “I have never lost to a Japanese opponent [in amateur fights] before. This time, the result will be the same. Kimura might be eight years younger than me, but I will speak with my fists. I will teach the younger boxer a good lesson.”

www.boxingscene.com/photos-zou-shiming-sho-kimura-make-weight-battle–118895?print_friendly=1

Shiming, Kimura make weight

Photos: Sumio Yamada

Zou Shiming 111.9 vs. Sho Kimura 111.5
(WBO world flyweight title)

Dong Chaoqun 160 vs. Sunil Khokhar 159
Sun Bohao 121 vs. Sithsaithong Lapkatok 121.5
Aming Buhe 140 vs. Bima Prakosa 140
Yan Jie 160 vs. Joe Corner 160
Chen Zubiao 114 vs. Anuj Singh 116

Venue: Shanghai Oriental Sports Center, Shanghai, China
Promoter: Zou Shiming

   

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