05/14/2017 Tamao Ozawa vs. Hong Seoyeon

Date:  Sunday, May 14, 2017

Vacant WBO Female Jr. Flyweight Championship Title Bout

Location: KBS Hall, Kyoto, Kyoto, Japan

Promoter:    Future Promotions

Supervisor:     Tsuyoshi Yasukochi

Referee:   Takeo Arawa

Judges:    Sawaeng Thaweekoon (96-94);  Mekin Sumon (96-94);  Salven Lagumbay (94-96)

Results:  The Vacant WBO Female Jr. Flyweight Title was obtained by Tamao Ozawa against Hong Seoyeon (Su Yun Hong) by Split Decision.

TV: 

12/10/2016 Joseph Parker vs. Andy Ruiz, Jr.

Date:   Saturday, December 10, 2016

VACANT WBO HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP TITLE BOUT

Location: Vector Arena, Auckland, New Zealand

Promoter:  Duco Events / David Higgins, Dean Lonergan

Supervisor:  Richard De Cuir

Referee:  Tony Weeks

Judges:  Ramon Cerdan (115-113), Salven Lugumbay (114-114), Ingo Barrabas (115-113)

Results: Joseph Parker wins by Mayority Decision

TV:  New Zealand Sky Arena, USA HBO, Australia FOX

08/20/2016 Riku Kano vs. Katsunari Takayama

Date:   Saturday, August 20, 2016

VACANT WBO MINI-FLYWEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP TITLE BOUT

Location:   Komagatani Gym, Sanda Hyogo, Japan

Promoter:  Taisei Marumoto / Taisei Promotions

Supervisor: Leon Panoncillo

Referee:  Danrex Tapdasan

Judges:    Salven Lugumbay (58-56);   Waleska Roldan  (59-56);  Lynne Carter (59-55)

Results:   The vacant WBO Mini-Flyweight Championship was adquired by Katsunari Takayama over Riku Kano. Takayama was awarded a Unanimous Technical Decision

Takayama awarded WBO 105lb belt by technical decision

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By Joe Koizumi
Photos: Sumio Yamada –

Japanese veteran speedster Katsunari Takayama (31-8-1NC, 12 KOs), 105, acquired the vacant WBO 105-pound belt as he was awarded a unanimous technical decision over 18-year-old prospect Riku Kano (10-2-1, 5 KOs), 105, due to Takayama’s deteriorated laceration at 0:58 of the sixth round on Saturday in Sanda, Japan. Salven Lagumbay (Philippines) scored the competitive fight 58-56, Waleska Roldan (US) and Lynne Carter (US) had it 59-56 and 59-55 respectively, all for the 33-yer-old ex-titlist. As expected, the notorious bleeder Takayama bled from a gash over the left eyebrow due to an accidental butt from the third on, but not as expected, the victor wasn’t his opponent but Takayama. When the referee Danrex Tapdasan of the Philippines halted the affair midway in round six, some 3,000 spectators, most of whom were Kano adherents, believed Kano was a winner by a TKO. But the fact was a technical decision, which resulted in a victory for Takayama against Sanda citizens’ earnest expectations.

People wanted to see the fight until the end, because they realized Takayama’s tendency of slowing down in later rounds and the much younger Kano would display his superior stamina therein. But the technical decision shuttered Kano’s ambition as well as Sanda people’s expectations.

Kano, a southpaw youngster, made a good start by connecting with southpaw right hooks to the onrushing veteran Takayama in the opening session. The second saw Takayama start to show his trademark quick combinations upstairs and downstairs regardless of precision. Since then, Kano occasionally caught the veteran with southpaw lefts followed by right hooks, but Takayama proved busier in mixing up by pinning Kano to the ropes. Kano, in round four, was so aggressive that he kept stalking the older foe, but Takayama landed a solid right to shake him up in the middle of the session.

People realized Kano could punch harder, but he punched at a time, while Takayama threw punches in combination to the face and the body. The audience was stunned to see the bout abruptly stopped midway in the sixth, when the ringside physician advised the third man to halt the affair against people’s expectations.

Takayama thus acquired the world belt on five occasions to his credit, while Kano tasted a bitter setback despite a warm support by his manager/promoter/trainer Taisei Marumoto, ex-OPBF welter champ. But it may be true that Kano needs more experience and this defeat might be a good lesson for his future surge.

Takayama said, “I wished to fight until the end to win the world belt. I feel sorry to the ambitious Kano, who is talented and will zoom up in the near future. We may have to fight again.”

The upcoming promoter Marumoto was crestfallen, but said, “People here might feel indigestion at such a termination, but I’ll promote a rematch at our earliest convenience to show them the unseen second half of the bout.”

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www.fightnews.com/Boxing/takayama-awarded-wbo-105lb-belt-technical-decision-351054/nggallery/page/3

 

WBO KIDS DRUG FREE IN CEBU (PHOTOS)

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By Rene Bonsubre, Jr. –

CEBU CITY, PHILIPPINES – The SOS Children’s Village played host to the World Boxing Organization’s WKDF Drug Free Program activities held Monday afternoon.

The SOS Children’s Village in Talamban,Cebu City is home to children who are orphaned or abandoned. It is one of many branches nationwide that give children in need a home and facilities for education and development.

The WBO sponsored a sports event for the kids living inside the village. The children were divided into four teams – with shirts colored yellow, blue, black and red with the WBO logo as uniforms – for a tug-of-war competition.

The teams were matched in a best of three test of strength with the Blue Team emerging as the champion. The children had lots of fun the entire afternoon and were treated with a sumptuous meal by the organizers.

All the participants were awarded school bags and they were also given rubberized mats that can be sued for sports and school activities. On hand for the event and giving prizes to the winners and participants was WBO Asia Pacific VP Leon Panoncillo assisted by Promoter Sammy Gello-ani.

They also provided short speeches to the children reminding them to stay away from drugs and pursue their education or a career in boxing or other sports. Also on hand in organizing the event was Gello-ani’s wife Cora.

WBO VP Panoncillo received a plaque from appreciation from the Children’s Village. The SOS also works in hand with the Cebu City Task Force for Street Children. More than a hundred kids are being cared for inside this facility.

Also on hand for the WBO “Say No to Drugs” program were boxers form the SGG stable, WBO judges Edgar Olalo, Salven Lagumbay, Arnie Najera and Edward Ligas, referees Tony Pesons and Romar Embodo, and PBC/Macao ring inspectors Arcade Terrado and Martin Redona.

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The Yellow Team in the WBO Tug-of-War game held at the SOS Children-s Village in Cebu.

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The Yellow Team in the WBO Tug-of-War game held at the SOS Children-s Village in Cebu.

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The Blue Team celebrates after winning the finals.

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WBO Vice-President for Asia-Pacific Leon Panoncillo poses with the runner-up winner Black Team.

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Panoncillo with the finals winner Blue Team.

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Panoncillo distributes the WBO bags and rubber mats giveaway to the children.

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Panoncillo gives the cash awards to a member of the winning team.

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Panoncillo speaks during the awarding of the prizes and the distribution of WBO gifts to the SOS Children’s Village in Cebu.

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Panoncillo receives a certificate of appreciation from SOS Children’s Village official Delia Saberon.

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WBO boxing officials and boxing personalities in Cebu who joined the Monday WBO Kids Drug Free Program in Cebu.

More photos:

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http://philboxing.com/news/story-110548.html

Full Report: Tanaka wins WBO title in 5th pro bout

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By Joe Koizumi
Photos by Boxing Beat

19-year-old unbeaten Japanese, Kosei Tanaka (5-0, 2 KOs), 105, very impressively acquired the vacant WBO 105-pound belt as he kept outspeeding and outpunching Mexican Julian Yedras (24-2, 13 KOs), 105, to win a unanimous decision over twelve fast rounds on Saturday in Komaki, Japan.

The official tallies read: Salven Lagumbay (Philippines) and Sawang Thaweekoon (Thailand) both 117-111, and Luis Ruiz (Puerto Rico) 115-113, all in favor of Tanaka, who thus won the world throne in his fifth pro bout. The referee was Samuel Viruet (US) who also moved so well as the busy-moving contestants. Tanaka, whose amateur mark was 46-5, 18 stoppages, displayed fast jabs, quick combinations and effective left hooks, and maintained the initiative despite the game Mexican’s occasional retaliation. Tanaka proved a real thing with such a fine performance as he looked like a young and small Sugar Ray Leonard. 

Tanaka, an sophomore of Chukyo University, appeared sophomoric, utilizing various skills against the more experienced but one-dimensional Mexican such as shifty footwork, sharp flicker-jabbing, looping or short left hooking, well-timed countering and occasional infighting. Tanaka, much more skillful than Yedras, was an enfant terrible. The reporter hesitates to abuse a word of “genius” since, if doing so, there are so many geniuses here in Japan as three-class world champ Hiroki Ioka, two-time titlist Naoya Inoue, etc. But Tanaka is more than a vastly talented youngster by winning the crowd’s applause not only with his coronation but with his spectacular performance.

We, in Japan, now see nine world champions excluding Japan-based foreign titleholders such as Jorge Linares, but, only in terms of hand speed, Tanaka might be one of the best as he displayed lightening combinations to the game but slower Mexican, who said after the fight, “Tanaka was very fast and was too elusive with his lateral movement for me to catch up with. The chico (young kid) was splendid on speed, power and heart. I’m happy to have fought such a good boxer.” It is truly rare to hear such a straightforward admiration on a winner from a loser.

Tanaka, from the outset, showed his superior speed as he threw whiplash jabs and left-right combinations to the still cautious Mexican hombre. His mobility was reminiscent of Muhammad Ali in his rematch with Ken Norton. The second round witnessed the Japanese boy penetrate Yedras’ tight guard with a solid left-right combo to have him reeling to the ropes.

It was Tanaka that swept the first three rounds with a fine display of remarkable hand speed with good precision and power. Some 4,500 supporters in attendance at Park Arena Komaki were worried about his proper distribution of stamina, as he appeared to have started fireworks by consuming too much energy at the earlier stage.

As expected from his too hot opening attack, Tanaka’s vaunted footwork temporarily stopped midway in round four, when the shorter Mexican came forward and came close to him with a flurry of punches even on the block of the Japanese youngster, who recklessly responded to his rallies in the close range. It’s Yedras’ round.

Tanaka, however, won back the fifth session as he very furiously retaliated with a two-fisted attack, but seemingly spent too much energy—as if it had been a six-round competition—just to win a point even though his countering right uppercut had the knees almost buckled. The kid often caught the onrushing Mexican puncher with looping left hooks to the temple that apparently hurt Yedras, who nonetheless kept stalking the footworker.

Tanaka, in round six, recklessly mixed it up in the close quarter and Yedras maintained the pressure with incessant short punches to the face and to the midsection, while the youngster attempted to swap punches toe-to-toe with him without using his feet. Yedras was apparently in command. The crowd was afraid that the tide had turned then and there, and Yedras would take back the initiative from then onward.

It was, however, in the seventh that Tanaka showed his best as he courageously attacked the Mexican willing mixer with much faster combinations upstairs and downstairs. His jabs and one-two-left hook combinations were all effective enough to hurt the Mexican, who still refused to go down and tried to fight back with his best effort. It was a very furious round, which might be a good candidate of Round of the Year.

When Yedras returned to his corner, we saw he had the right cheek badly swollen with a lump due to his absorption of punishment. But he looked still mentally strong and willing to fight on.

The eighth was also hard-fought by the aggressive contestants, who exchanged hot rallies. Tanaka, with better precision, had the upper hand and almost stunned Yedras with a strong left-right combination. The Mexican warrior, however, landed a vicious right counter that shook up the Japanese prospect. Two judges favored Tanaka, while one gave a point to Yedras.

After the eighth round was over, the Tanaka adherents realized that there would be still no less than four more rounds though he had already consumed too much stamina due to his feverishly high pace. The worriers might be expecting Tanaka would be slowing down and Yedras would catch him with solid body shots as his Mexican cornermen incessantly kept yelling, “Abajo (downstairs)!”.

This reporter hereby becomes a Peeping Tom onto the interim scoresheet, though the open scoring system wasn’t applied to this bout. That’s 79-73, 78-74 and 77-75 in favor of Tanaka.

Amazingly did Tanaka turn loose in the ninth and keep punching almost entirely for three minutes. Where’s his energy from? From his youth? Yedras, of course, fought back hard but Tanaka’s faster combinations and hit-and-run tactics kept him from catching the busy and elusive target. Tanaka seemingly welcomed a second wind, as he accelerated freely punching and moving without feeling any fatigue.

Then we realized that Tanaka, a 19-year-young kid, wasn’t a Bernard Hopkins or a Japanese baseball player working in the US, Ichiro Suzuki, both of whom are 41 years of age. Kosei’s storage of abundant stamina was so astounding that the partisan crowd then expected Tanaka would maintain such a high pace and win the game.

Then tenth was spectacular enough since Tanaka’s footwork prevailed as fast as in the first three rounds and he served as a Sugar Ray Leonard in playing tag in a game of children. Busily jabbing and circling around the flat-footed Mexican, who was still aggressive and willing to mix it up, Tanaka finely displayed hit-and-run tactics to impress the crowd.

The eleventh witnessed Tanaka become a typical speedster, throwing flashy hand punches very fast but without putting his weight behind punches. He looked to have dominated this round only with his hand speed, and two judges gave this round to Tanaka, while another to Yedras who threw power punches even with low precision.

“With three more minutes you’ll be champion,” cried his chief second and father Hitoshi to encourage his son. Tanaka furiously commenced the final session with all his energy, as Yedras did. It’s a total war with the game warriors. It’s Tanaka that whipped Yedras from all angles so furiously as if he would finish him to bring home the bacon. But his too furious last surge had Tanaka slowing down in the last thirty seconds, when Yedras was courageous enough to fight back with his heart. When the final bell sounded, people really appreciated the good game from the bottom of heart.

After the official verdict announced his coronation Tanaka jubilantly said in the ring, “I’ve arrived at this place I had been aiming at for a long time since my childhood. I really thank for your people’s continually warm supports.”

Kosei Tanaka had a unique career. His father Hitoshi used to be a black belt of judo and Japanese national arm wrestling champion. He made his son learn karate at the age of three with his elder brother by two years, Ryosei, a student of Komazawa University, who is still amateur and national titlist for four years in a row. Kosei, when twelve, started learning how to box from his father, who has kept coaching his son since. Tanaka family was like Danny Garcia’s though Hitoshi isn’t as eloquent as Danny’s dad Angel.

To make a long story short, Kosei acquired national high school championship four times and turned professional under the tutelage of Kiyoshi Hatanaka, the first world champ ever produced in Nagoya area.

Tanaka, in November 2013, successfully made a pro debut by defeating WBO#6 Oscar Reknafa by a lopsided 6-round decision in Nagoya. Nicknamed “Knockout Dream Boy”, Kosei won a unanimous nod over WBA#13 Ronelle Ferreras in March 2014. His third bout saw a first-round knockout over OPBF#3 ranked Philippine champ Crison Omayao in July 2014. Tanaka, as the mandatory challenger, had an ambitious shot at WBO#2 OPBF 105-pound titlist and impressively dethroned him via tenth round TKO in October of the previous year. Literally that’s all as for his pre-history of coronation.

Chukyo University has produced many excellent young athletes such as Koji Murofuse (Olympic gold medalist in the shot put), Mao Asada (Olympic silver medalist in the figure skating), etc. Kosei Tanaka is one of those who have raised the Alma Mater’s reputation. Kosei is a little different from other boxers dependent on blood and guts since he often describes himself as a thinking boxer.

His manager/promoter Kiyoshi Hatanaka’s overall record was 25-2-1, 15 KOs, as he only suffered a couple of setbacks at the hand of as many Mexicans—Gilberto Roman and Daniel Zaragoza—each with a world championship at stake in 1988 and 1991 respectively. Tanaka avenged his manager’s setbacks to the Mexicans with his impressive victory.

Leon Panoncillo, the WBO supervisor, said, “Tanaka is the pride of our organization. He’s much better than we had expected. We hope he will grow up to be multiple-class champion since he is really talented. I love his tremendous hand speed in combination punching and his strong heart as well.”

The third man Samuel Viruet expressed his impression on the newly crowned champ, saying, “Tanaka boxed like a Bruce Lee, feinting, jabbing and shuffling. It’s fun watching him fight like that as the third man.”

This reporter hereby has to amend the list of “World Champions in Fewest Fights” that was previously compiled by historian Bob Yalen and yours truly by adding the Knockout Dream Boy.

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Tanaka always writes an autograph of “KOsei” which means, in Japanese, “Do Knockout!” This is just for your reference.

Tanaka became the fourth of the youngest world champions out of Japan, as shown by an attached list.

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Tanaka is also the fifth world titlist ever produced from Nagoya area in Japan.

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In the end, this record-keeper hereby lists up our current world champions in Japan.

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There are more episodes on Kosei Tanaka’s coronation, but should this reporter write them all, this writing wouldn’t finish within days. We just say we have had another good champion here in Japan.

Promoter: Hatanaka Promotions.
WBO supervisor: Leon Panoncillo (US).

http://www.fightnews.com/Boxing/full-report-tanaka-wins-wbo-title-in-5th-pro-bout-293074

05/30/2015 Kosei Tanaka vs. Julian Yedras

Date:   Saturday, May 30, 2015

WBO VACANT MINI FLYWEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP TITLE BOUT

Location: Park Arena, Komaki, Alchi, Japan

Promoter: Hatanaka Promotions / Kiyoshi Hatanaka

Supervisor:   Leon Panoncillo

Referee:  Samuel Viruet

Judges:  Salven Lugumbay (117-111); Luis Ruiz (115-113);  Sawaeng Thaweekoon (117-111)

Results:   The Japanese, Kosei Tanaka acquired the vacant WBO Mini Flyweight Championship Title (105-pound) as he kept outspeeding and outpunching Mexican Julian Yedras, to win a unanimous decision over twelve fast rounds in Komaki, Japan.

TV:

11/22/2014 Vasyl Lomachenko vs. Chonlatarn Piriyapinyo

Date:  Saturday, November 22, 2014

WBO  FEATHERWEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP TITLE BOUT

Location:  Cotai Arena, Venetian Resort, Macao, Macao S.A.R., China

Promoter:   Top Rank / Bob Arum

Supervisor:   Luis A. Perez

Referee:    Luis Pabon

Judges:  Michael Pernick (120-107) \ Patrick Morley (120-107) \ Salven Lugumbay (120-107)

Results:   The Champion Vasyl Lomachenko retained the WBO Featherweight Title by Unanimous Decision against Chonlatarn Piriyapinyo.

TV:   Hungary Sport 1   USA HBO PPV   New Zealand Sky Arena

(11/15/2014) DONNIE NIETES vs. CARLOS VELARDE

Date:  Saturday, November 15, 2014

WBO  JR. FLYWEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP TITLE BOUT

Location:  Cebu City Waterfront Hotel & Casino, Barangay Lahug, Cebu City, Phillipines

Promoter:   ALA Promotions / Michael D. Aldeguer

Supervisor:   Leon Panoncillo

Referee:   Robert Byrd

Judges:  Rose M. Lacend; Salven Lugumbay; Masakazu Murase

Results:   The WBO Jr. Flyweight Champion Donnie Nietes successfully defended the title stopping Carlos Velarde  by KO in the seventh round.

TV:  Phillipines ABS-CBN Channel 2

(03/01/2014) Ricky Burns vs. Terence Crawford

Date:  Saturday, March 1, 2014

WBO Lightweight Championship Title

Location:  Scottish Exhibition Centre, Glasgow, Scotland, UK

Promoter:  Matchroom Boxing

Supervisor:  István Kovács

Referee:   Luis Pabón

Judges:   Salven Lugumbay (116-112), Alejandro Lopez Cid (117-111), Zoltan Envedi (116-112)

Result:  Terence Crawford obtained the WBO Lightweight Title by unanimous decision.

 

YAMADA DETHRONES HONG TO SNATCH WBO TITLE

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Chuncheon, KOREA–In a fast-paced action fight, Japan’s Mako Yamada outhustled and outpointed defending WBO minimum weight champion Su-Yun Hong over ten rounds at the city gymnasium here.

The shorter Yamada fought with laser-guided precision, sweeping the first three rounds to befuddle the taller defending champion who was heavily breathing starting in the second frame.

By the fourth, and egged on by hometown crowd, Hong upped his tempo a bit, making the fight exciting with both fighters taking and giving punches.

Yamada’s speed and volume-punching proved too much, however, as she cruised to a split decision victory.

Neutral judge Salven Lagumbay of the Philippines scored it 96-94 for Yamada, Japan’s Katsuhiko Nakamura saw it 97-93 for Yamada, while Korean judge Joint Sum Kwon had it 97-96 for Hong. The Korean judge scored three of the rounds a 10-10.

Referee Danrex Tapdasan observed that the defending champ Hong was already breathing heavily as early as the second round.

A possible rematch can be worked out, according to WBO Asia Chairman Leon Panoncillo who supervised the bout. Hong’s handlers own an option to Yamada’s next defense.

Yamada’s handlers, meanwhile, can also bid to hold the fight in Japan, which has recently affiliated itself to the WBO in a special ceremony last year with no less than WBO President Paco Valcarcel in attendance.

With the win, Yamada now boasts of 7 wins, no loss with 2 KO’s while the dethroned Hong tastes her first defeat against 9 wins.

NOTES: Former ALA fighter and RP champion Bart Abapo took time off from his job as a boxing trainer here to visit this writer and WBO chief Leon Panncillo and referee Tapdasan…Chuncheon is just two hours away from communist country North Korea…JBC’s Aaron Ning is probably the hardest-working boxing official in Korea…

http://philboxing.com/news/story-91891.html

HONG TO DEFEND WBO FEMALE TITLE IN KOREA TODAY AGAINST JAPAN’S YAMADA

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Chuncheon, KOREA–An interesting bust-up takes place here today as reigning WBO mini flyweight world champion Su-Yun-Hong defends her title against Japan’s Mako Yamada over ten rounds at the city gymnasium.

This is a highly anticipated face-off between the two undefeated lady boxers, with both media outlets from both countries giving attention to the fight.

Hong came in at 105 lbs, while Yamada was 103 lbs at yesterday’s weigh-in supervised by WBO Asia Pacific chairman Leon Panoncillo.

Hong, unblemished in 9 scraps with 5 KO’s, will be making the third defense of the title he won back in 2012. Yamada, 19, is unbeaten in 6 bouts with 2 KO’s.

Promoter for today’s bout is YMW Promotions headed by Moyung-Woo Yuh.

Third man on the ring is lawyer Danrex Tapdasan while judges are ABC-accredited Salven Lagumbay of the Philippines, Japan’s Katsuhiko Nakamura, and Korea’s Joong-Suk Kwon.

http://philboxing.com/news/story-91877.html

LEAPAI RETAINS WBO HEAVY CROWN IN CHINA

ALEX LEAPAI.lionheartPhoto: Google images/www.aus-boxing.com —


PhilBoxing.com

Hengyang, CHINA–Australia’s Alex “Lionheart” Leapai proved true to his moniker after he eked out a workmanlike stoppage win over the very game Mexican heavyweight fighter Felipe Romero at the jampacked Hengyang Stadium here, in the process retaining his World Boxing Organization (WBO) Asia Pacific heavyweight title.

The Samoa-born Leapai, who came in at 110 kilograms at the weigh-in prior to the bout, applied pressure all throughout the bout, but found himself at the receiving end of Romero’s jabs and body shots along the way. Fighting with blood oozing from his nostrils, Romero tried to outbox Leapai, but could not handle the power of the reigning champion.

Leapai scored the first knockdown of the night right at the get-go, sending Romero crashing to the canvas for the count, but could not put away the fleet-footed heavyweight Mexican who danced his way out of harm’s way.

The end came at the 2:13 mark of the ninth round after Leapai sent Romero twice to the canvas, prompting referee Bruce McTavish to put an end to the fight.

Leapai was quoted as saying he broke his hand in the first round, which could have explained why he could not finished Romero earlier than expected.

At the time of the stoppage, both judges Salven Lagumbay and Danrex Tapdasan of the Philippines scored the bout 77-74 for Leapai while Thailand’s Sawaeng Thaweekon saw it at 78-73 in favor of the Queensland-based heavyweight. With the win, Leapai improved to 29 wins, 4 losses, 3 draws with with 24 knockouts. Romero dipped to 16 wins, 7 losses, 1 draw with 11 knockouts.

Supervisor for the fight was WBO Asia Pacific chairman Leon Panoncillo assisted by WBO Australia representative Danny Leigh.

Meanwhile, earlier in the day, promoter Liu Gang also sponsored a seminar for officials conducted by the WBO, where Chinese pro boxing officials learned tips from veteran fight officials Bruce McTavish, Salven Lagumbay, Sawaeng Thaweekon, and Danrex Tapdasan.

The aim was to improve pro boxing officiating in China, said the 42-year-old Liu Gang, one of China’s biggest promoters.

http://philboxing.com/news/story-85992.html

 

WBO OFFICIALS HAILED FOR TOPNOTCH PROFESSIONALISM

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Pinoy Pride XXI WBO Officials (L-R): Referee Raul Caiz Jr, Judges Salven Lagumbay, Ed Olalo, Joe Garcia and Bruce McTavish, WBO Vice-President Leon Panoncillo Jr, Referee Danrex Tapdasan and Judge Ulysses Glen. Photo by Dong Secuya.

No less than the biggest boxing promoters in the country are in agreement that when it comes to holding the biggest and the best events, officials of the World Boxing Organization (WBO) in the Philippines and elsewhere in Asia are at par with the best anywhere in the world.

This was nowhere more evident than during the “Pinoy Pride XXI” event at the plush Solaire Resort and Casino, where the WBO once again had a big night with two title belts being put at stake for the mega boxing promotion.

WBO Asia Pacific chairman Leon Panoncillo, who single-handedly brought the WBO in Asia into the world, takes much pride in his officials, indicating the high level of professionalism attained by the officials all through these years.

This is the same professionalism that has earned the respect of ALA Promotions, the country’s biggest promoter, as the WBO officials are noted for the amount of improvement they have racked up since the first edition of Pinoy Pride series.

“I commend you for arriving on time for the weigh-ins and rules meetings. I know you are busy in your respective fields, but you really take the time to join each rules meeting and you dress the part,” said Panoncillo, noting that WBO officials are always prim and proper during meetings leading up to fight night.

ALA Promotions patriarch, the beloved sportsman Antonio L. Aldeguer, is always first to commend the WBO officials based on how they conduct themselves during weigh-ins and fight night. WBO officials always attend weigh-ins in suits and formal attire, a big departure from the old school organizations whose officials wear jeans and shirts during weigh-ins and press conferences.

WBO Asia chairman Leon Panoncillo also makes sure everything is in order before each fight, making sure all purses, sanctioning fees and officials’ fees are turned in before the first bell. This is a far cry from stories we hear of fighters and officials not getting paid in other organizations.

Even ABS-CBN, which covers the ‘Pinoy Pride’ series and the biggest television network in the country, are apparently impressed with how the WBO runs shows in the country. Veteran sportswriter and commentator Ronnie Nathanielsz always notes how the officials score fairly and conduct themselves in the right manner.

As it is, all these is a result of long years of improving and having a keen understanding of the sport, said Panoncillo.

“We could not have done this without the support of credible promoters like ALA Promotions and leading network like ABS-CBN,” the WBO exec said.

In the Philippines, the WBO boasts of two officials who are licensed by the Association of Boxing Commissions (ABC), regarded as the universal organization for boxing. International boxing judge Salven Lagumbay was the first Filipino to earn an ABC certification, followed by international referee Danrex Tapdasan. International judge Edward Ligas is also a regular WBO Convention attendee, just like Lagumbay and Tapdasan.

http://philboxing.com/news/story-85251.html

Oficiales de Stieglitz-Kiyota, Sabillo-Estrada

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Photo:  Peter Gercke/SES Boxing –

La Organización Mundial de Boxeo (OMB) anuncia los oficiales que trabajarán este sábado, 13 de julio, en las defensas titulares de los campeones mundiales Robert Stieglitz y Merlito Sabillo, que cobrarán vida en Alemania y Filipinas, respectivamente.  

El presidente de la OMB, Francisco “Paco” Valcárcel, informó que para el choque que se efectuará en el Energie Verbund-Arena en Dresden, Sachsen, Alemania, donde el ruso radicado en ese país, Robert Stieglitz (44-3, 25 KOs) expondrá por primera vez frente al japonés Yuzo Kiyota (23-3-1, 21 KOs) el cetro supermediano (168 libras) que le arrebató en marzo pasado a Arthur Abraham, el árbitro será el estadounidense Celestino Ruiz

Los tres jueces para el encuentro del monarca Stieglitz y el décimo clasificado Kiyota son Alejandro López Cid, de México, Terry O’Connor, de Inglaterra, e Ingo Barrabas, de Alemania. El supervisor de la OMB para este choque encuentro, presentado por Sport Events Steinforth, será el propio presidente de la entidad, el puertorriqueño Francisco “Paco” Valcárcel

Por otra parte, para la pelea que se llevará a cabo en el Solaire Resort Hotel and Casino de Pasay City, Metro Manila, Filipinas, en que el titular de peso mínimo de la OMB, el filipino Merlito Sabillo (22-0, 11 KOs), defenderá su correa ante el colombiano Jorle Estrada (17-6, 6 KOs), clasificado número 15, el árbitro será Raúl Caíz Jr., de Estados Unidos. 

Mientras, los jueces que trabajarán en el pleito Sabillo-Estrada son los estadounidenses Joe García y Ulysses Glen, así como el filipino Salven Lagumbay. El supervisor de la OMB para este combate será Leon Panoncillo Jr.  

La pelea entre Sabillo y Estrada es una presentación de ALA Promotions.

http://www.notifight.com/artman2/publish/Comunicado_25/Oficiales_de_Stieglitz-Kiyota_Sabillo-Estrada.php

JASON PAGARA SETS NEXT TARGET – ALA KNOWS BEST

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By Maloney L. Samaco  –  

Jason Pagara successfully defended his World Boxing Organization (WBO) international light welterweight title. It was a convincing unanimous decision win over Aaron Herrera of Mexico. Pagara said it’s all up to his boss Antonio L. Aldeguer to chart his future fights. But he is always prepared for any challenge that might come along the way.

It seemed that Pagara was on his way to a knockout victory as promised during the pre-fight press conferences. He knocked the Mexican down who touched the floor with his gloves and received an eight-count from the referee Bruce McTavish. But La Joya recovered and withstood the best punches the Filipino champion could slap on him.

The Mexican challenger had his moments of dominance in the middle rounds when the ALA standout seemed to run out of steam. But the impressive final three rounds proved to be the Filipino’s selling point as he asserted his power over the visiting foe.

jaca-perea.fn.05.330wPagara convinced all three judges to score a unanimous decision. The scores are 115-112 by Salven Lagumbay, 116-111 by Tony Pesons, but the 119-108 score by Arnie Najera may be too much.

El Niño traced his roots from Maasin City and honed up his skills in Cagayan de Oro City under the patronage of Misamis Oriental governor now CDO mayor-elect Oscar Moreno.

The WBO top contender is the next Pacquiao foe Brandon Rios. The number two contender is undefeated American Karim Mayfield and the number three is Sehiy Fedchenko of Ukraine, who once fought and lost to Marquez.

If he intends to challenge the other organizations’ titles then he has to contend with WBA and WBC champion Danny Garcia, who is also The Ring champion, or IBF champion Lamont Peterson.

The light welterweight division is overcrowded with talents. But Pagara is still young and has the great potential still waiting to be tapped. He has to train in the United States to be at par with the world class fighters of his category.

And during the post-fight interview over ABS-CBN, Pagara said “ALA knows best.”

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http://philboxing.com/news/story-83731.html

BOOM BOOM BAUTISTA LOSES TITLE, HANGS UP HIS GLOVES

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Rey “Boom Boom” Bautista lost his WBO Intercontinental featherweight title in a sometimes ugly brawl with rough and rugged Mexican challenger Jose “Negro” Ramirez before a wildly cheering crowd of fight fans at the University of Southeastern Philippines gym after which respected ALA Promotions patron Tony Aldeguer told the Manila Standard it was time for Bautista to retire.

It was a decision concurred in by his son, ALA Promotions president Michael Aldeguer and one that was relayed to Bautista who, despite a gallant effort, showed the wear and tear of an entertaining and exciting career that forced the Aldeguers hand.

From the time he was dropped in the opening round by a left-right combination to the chin and suffered a cut from an accidental head-butt, Bautista was unable to find his rhythm or to inflict any serious damage on the Mexican who surprisingly found himself at the end of a 111-114 scorecard by judge Edward Ligas which drew loud boos from the crowd when it was announced by Ted Lerner.

However, judges Danrex Tapdasan and Salven Lagumbay saved the day as well as the reputation and integrity of the Philippines when they correctly scored the fight for Ramirez by an identical 114-111 score which drew cheers from the fans in Davao who, like the rest of the country, abhor hometown decisions.

The action was fast and furious and spiced with quite a few ugly tactics by both fighters and in the din of the crowd international referee Bruce McTavish as well as the fighters didn’t hear the bell signaling the end of round two and continued to throw punches.

After a furious exchange in round three McTavish went to the corner of Bautista and asked him “Are you okay?” to which “Boom Boom’ replied “Yes, I’m okay.”

Ramirez was cautioned for using his head in round five and received a second warning from McTavish in the very next round, prompting Bautista to retaliate with some nasty tactics of his own prompting McTavish who did a tremendous job under trying circumstances to admonish Bautista telling him “Boom Boom keep it clean.”

Bautista hurt Ramirez with a solid right hand in round seven before dropping him with an excellent one-two combination in round eight.

Another head-butt by Ramirez in the tenth round forced the referee to penalize the Mexican a point for repeatedly charging forward with his head with an elbow on the side of Bautista’s head causing a cut which bled profusely before the ring physician took a look at it on the request of McTavish and ruled that Bautista could continue.

The tide had clearly turned in favor of Ramirez in the so-called championship rounds as he slammed Bautista with body shots and occasionally used a clubbing right hand to the side of the head.

Ramirez hurt Bautista in the penultimate round as the Filipino uncharacteristically resorted to holding, shoving and complaining about the tactics of Ramirez who kept boring in to the end to earn a well-deserved victory and continue the painful series of losses of Filipino champions.

It began with Manny Pacquiao’s crushing 6th round knockout by Juan Manuel Marquez last December 8 and the back-to-back weekend losses of WBO/WBA flyweight champion Brian Viloria to another Mexican Juan Carlos Estrada on April 6 at the Venetian Resort Hotel in Macau and WBO,Ring Magazine and WBC Diamond Belt champion Nonito “The Filipino Flash” Donaire loss to WBA champion and two-time Olympic gold medalist Guillermo Rigondeaux in a lackluster unification title bout before a sell-out crowd at the iconic Radio City Music Hall in New York. last April 13.

The Aldeguer father and son were convinced that it was time for Bautista to hang up his gloves.

Tony Aldeguer who looks after his fighters and doesn’t take money from them said Bautista was well-set. He has two houses, four cars, a few businesses and money in the bank and it was time for him to look after his wife and newborn baby.

Aldeguer said “Boom Boom” had given fight fans lots of excitement during his career and he had nothing to be ashamed of.

http://philboxing.com/news/story-82571.html